Dave Magadan – 1994 Upper Deck

November 19, 2010

Can You Tone That Teal Down Just A Skosh, I’m Blind Now. Thanks!

Before I got back into the game, I forgot just how TEAL those early Marlins uniforms were.

Magadan was a player whose skill sets on offense (average and patience) and his weaknesses (power and speed) made him a mis-matched type of player. He could have been a great middle infielder, but didn’t play there, and as a corner infielder he didn’t have the power. He was basically a rich man’s Jim Eppard.

While he had a long career, he didn’t make the mega bucks, and he really didn’t become a star. That’s what happens when your OPS falls 150 points after your best year. You try to survive.

Magadan had a transaction merry-go-round in 1993. He was an original Marlin, but was traded in late July to Seattle in exchange for Henry Cotto and Jeff Darwin. He spent a lot of time at first filling in for Tino Martinez. But a month after the season, he was shipped BACK to Florida for…Jeff Darwin.

I don’t know if the 1/2 year rental was a Florida favor to Dave’s cousin Lou Piniella, but the Mariners got rid of Cotto, who promptly had a decent 1/2 season for the Marlins and disappeared. Maybe Cotto stole Lou’s Cheese Whiz.

After another powerless season in Florida (8 extra-base hits in 254 plate appearances is deep in slappy territory), Magadan became a wandering corner infielder / pinch hitter. A vagabond, ready to fill in a lace some singles past the infield to start a rally when called upon, and also to play first and third competently enough so the manager doesn’t have to take a chance on the AAA guy.

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2 Responses to “Dave Magadan – 1994 Upper Deck”


  1. […] catcher was 37. Their first baseman was a slappy. Jefferies was not meeting expectations. Elster couldn’t hit. Hubie Brooks was […]


  2. […] catcher was 37. Their first baseman was a slappy. Jefferies was not meeting expectations. Elster couldn’t hit. Hubie Brooks was […]


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