Scott Bailes – 1988 Donruss

November 5, 2010

One In Every Pack

He’s one of THOSE guys…

You know, the one you seemingly get in every pack, no matter what the brand.

It’s not Bailes, per se, but it’s always someone, every year, that you always seem to get many duplicates of a player that is less than stellar.

We had a pretty darn deep AL Rotiss league (12 teams x 23 players bidding on 14 AL teams) and Bailes was hardly ever drafted, IF ever.

Why?

High ERA

High WHIP

He played for Cleveland – so wins were out the window.

You wonder why he stayed in the bigs, then you realize that he’s a lefty. Still, that doesn’t help YOU, does it.

Bailes was notable in that he was who the Pirates traded when they relieved the Indians of Johnny Disaster er LeMaster.

He also was traded for Jeff Manto from Cleveland to California, and ended a long big league stint in 1992 after giving up a tasty 59 hits and 28 walks in 38 2/3 innings. A 7.45 ERA isn’t going to cut it even IF you have a 3-1 record, son.

He then re-emerged after a long absence to pitch for Texas in 1997 and 1998. Again, he’s a lefty AND YOU GOTTA HAVE  A LEFTY! Or two. Maybe three. At any rate he came up on August 7 and pitched well. In 1998…um…not so much (61 hits in 40 1/3 innings).

Those brief glimmers of hope, and his handed-ness, allowed him to keep coming back. Sort of like the way Tony Fossas and Greg Cadaret never died. Heck, I still think Mike Myers is out there waiting for the phone to ring.

Some guys I get a lot of, and I don’t mind (Geno Petralli comes to mind), and others…well…I attract them for some reason.

Now, whenever I get some junk wax era cards, I guarantee ONE of them will be Scott Bailes.

 

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2 Responses to “Scott Bailes – 1988 Donruss”

  1. night owl Says:

    I got a TON of Bailes cards. But it wasn’t 88 Donruss. It was 89 Topps.


  2. […] Dickie Noles), injury prone (Ernie Camacho), or never going to be a championship winning pitcher (Scott Bailes, Ken Schrom, Don Schulze, Neal Heaton) and guys that never fulfilled their potential (Greg […]


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